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The Izunome Principle and Love To explain Izunome, I use the terms daijo and shojo. The former represents the horizontal principle and the latter the vertical. Izunome represents a midpoint that unites the two. However, many people lean towards either one or the other and get stuck. They do not unite daijo and shojo. And […]

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Look at this extraordinary drawing by Yasushi Fujimoto. It is of Shumei’s founder, Mokichi Okada, tending his favorite flower, the camellia. Mokichi Okada is known as Meishusama, which means Master of Light. At Shumei America’s National Center in Pasadena, we display this drawing in our hall to honor Meishusama on February 10, the day he […]

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I have been deaf since birth. When I was one year old, my younger brother was born. When I was five, my twin sisters came into the world. Three of us four brothers and sisters have hearing impairments. Only one of us children was born with normal hearing. My poor mother did not have the […]

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George Bedell has worked as an editor, writer, and spokesman for Shumei for the past 20 years. He retires this year to devote himself to his first loves, the visual arts, time with loved ones, food, and plentiful rest. Shumei has two major Centers in America, the National Center in Pasadena and the Shumei International […]

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Roy Gibbon works in the Educational Department at Shumei America’s National Center in Pasadena, California. He is the co-author of the book “An Offering of Light.” The following is based on a Jyorei1 Intensive workshop2 held at Shumei’s International Institute in Crestone, Colorado. Roy Gibbon: We usually do Jyorei for just five minutes. However, at […]

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Barbara Hachipuka, a farmer and activist from Zambia, is Program Coordinator for the Mbabala Women Farmer’s Cooperative Union in Zambia’s Southern Province. Over a decade ago, she dreamt of carrying on her late mother’s work on behalf of the women farmers of Zambia, through the Farmer’s Cooperative. In partnership with Shumei, she initiated the beginning […]